Alberto Mantovani

Full Professor
Experimental Medicine and Pathophysiology

Teaching appointments: General Pathology, School of Medicine, Humanitas University

Vice Rector for Research at Humanitas University
Scientific Director, Humanitas Research Hospital
President, Fondazione Humanitas per la Ricerca.

European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) Member
Member, Accademia dei Lincei, Rome, Italy
Member, Robert Koch Stiftung, Berlin
President, International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS)

Email alberto.mantovani@hunimed.eualberto.mantovani@humanitasresearch.it 
Phone +39 02 82242444 / +39 02 82242445 / +39 02 82242446
Site humanitas-research.org/alberto-mantovani/

Education and Academic Background

Education 

  • 1973:     M.D., University of Milan, Italy
  • 1976:     Specialist in Oncology, University of Pavia, Italy

Academic Background

  • 1973-1975:      Research assistant Department of Tumor Immunobiology and Chemotherapy, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Milan, Italy.
  • 1975-1976:     Visiting fellow at the Department of Tumor Immunology, Chester Beatty Research Institute, Belmont, Sutton, Surrey, England.
  • 1978 and 1979:     Visiting fellow at the Laboratory of Immunodiagnosis, NIH, Bethesda, MD., USA, supported by a NATO Grant.
  • 1979-1981:      Senior investigator, Department of Tumor Immunology and Negri”, Milan, Italy
  • 1981-1996:     Chief, Laboratory of Immunology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Milan, Italy.
  • 1987:      Eleanor Roosvelt UICC Scholar, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation, NIH, Frederick, MD., USA.
  • 1994 to 2001:     Full Professor of General Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Brescia, Italy.
  • 1996 to 2005:     Head, Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Milan, Italy.
  • 2001 to 2014:     Full Professor of General Pathology, School of Medicine, State University of Milan, Italy

Scientific and Research Interests

Main Contributions

  • Tumor biology.  Demonstration in the late ‘70s of the protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages  (TAM, an acronym now generally used and coined by him in the ‘70s)  linking inflammation and cancer (reviewed in Balkwill and Mantovani, Lancet, 2001). TAM as a prototypic M2-like population (Mantovani et al., Nature 2008; Balkwill et al., Cancer Cell 2005).  First molecular linking of a genetic event (RET/PTC rearrangement)  causing cancer in humans to the construction of an inflammatory microenvironment (Borrello et al., PNAS 2005). Proof of principle that targeting tumor promoting macrophages has therapeutic value in humans (Germano et al, Cancer Cell 2013). Demonstration that PTX3 is an extrinsic oncosuppressor regulating Complement and macrophage driven tumor promoting inflammation (Bonavita et al Cell 2015). Alberto Mantovani is recognized among his peers as a forerunner in the ‘70s and a “founding father” of the renaissance of the inflammation-cancer connection.
  • Chemokines. Original description and role in TAM recruitment of a unique monocyte attractant, Monocyte Chemotactic  Protein-1 (CCL2), as tumor-derived chemotactic factor (Bottazzi et al, Science 1983). Characterization of chemokines and role in pathophysiology, including dendritic cell and polarized T cell migration. Induction of chemokine production by IL-6 in endothelial cells via trans-signaling, a key component of chronic inflammation and cancer (Romano et al, Immunity 1997). Characterization of D6 as a decoy receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines (Mantovani et al, Nature Rev. Immunol 2006). Role of chemokines in carcinogenesis (for a recent contribution Bonavita et al Cell 2015).  Role of the chemokines vMIPs in attracting Th2 cells and role of D6 (ACKR2) in Kaposi’s sarcoma.
  • IL-1/Toll-like receptors (TLR). Endothelial cell activation by IL-1 and cytokines (Rossi et al., Science 1985; Bussolino et al, Nature 1989; Romano et al, Immunity 1997). Identification of the type II receptor as a decoy receptor, a novel concept in biology (Colotta et al, Science 1993); the discovery of a decoy receptor represented a paradigm shift after the original definition of the concept of “receptor” by Langley at the 1930’; decoy receptors are now recognized as a general,  evolutionary conserved strategy to tune cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Cloning of an intracellular isoform of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (Muzio et al., J. Exp. Med.  1995). First demonstration of MyD88 as the adaptor of mammalian Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) and identification of downstream transducers (Muzio et al., J. Exp. Med. 1998). Cloning and characterization of TIR8/SIGIRR (IL-1R8), a negative regulator of IL-1 receptor and TLR signalling (Garlanda, et al, Immunity 2013). Role in carcinogenesis.
  • Humoral innate immunity: cloning (cDNA and genomic, mouse and human), structural and functional characterization of the first long pentraxin PTX3 as an IL-1 inducible gene (Garlanda et al, Nature 2002; Jeannin et al, Immunity 2005; Jaillon et al. J. Exp Med 2007 ; Deban et al, Nature Immunol. 2010; Jaillon et al. Immunity 2014; Bonavita et al. Cell 2015); structural immunobiology; role as a paradigm for humoral innate immunity; role as an extrinsic oncosuppresor in murine and human tumors regulating Complement and macrophage driven tumor promoting inflammation (Bonavita et al. Cell 2015); diagnostic and therapeutic translation (Cunha et al New England J. Med. 2014; ongoing). Thus, a regulator of macrophage-driven tumor promoting inflammation is a bona fide cancer gene, silenced in selected human tumors such as colorectal cancer, a finding now independently confirmed.

Selected publications

Originals

  • Bonavita E, Gentile S, Rubino M, Maina V, Papait R, Kunderfranco P, Greco C, Feruglio F, Molgora M, Laface I, Tartari S, Doni A, Pasqualini F, Barbati E, Basso G, Galdiero MR, Nebuloni M, Roncalli M, Colombo PG, Laghi L, Lambris JD, Jaillon S, Garlanda C, Mantovani A. – PTX3 is an extrinsic oncosuppressor regulating complement-dependent inflammation in cancer. Cell 160: 700-714, 2015.

Reviews 

  • Mantovani A., Marchesi F., Laghi L., Malesci A., Allavena P.  – Tumor-associated macrophages as treatment targets in oncology. Nature Rev, Clin. Oncol.;  adv. online publication 2017 doi: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2016.217

  • Sica A, Mantovani A. – Macrophage plasticity and polarization: in vivo veritas. J Clin Invest. 122: 787-795, 2012.

  • Mantovani A, Allavena P, Sica A, Balkwill F – Cancer-Related Inflammation. Nature 454: 436-444, 2008.

  • Mantovani, A., Romero, P., Paluka, AK., Marincola, FM. – Tumor immunity: effector response to tumor and the influence of the microenvironment. Lancet 371:771-783, 2008.

 

 

Academic honors, awards and prizes

Selected honors

  • 2016: Premio Roma allo Sviluppo del Paese.
  • 2016: Robert Koch Award, Robert Koch Stiftung, Germany
  • 2016: International Feltrinelli Prize from the Accademia dei Lincei.
  • 2016: OECI (Organization of European Cancer Institutes) Prize for contribution to cancer immunology and immunotherapy. OECI awards the OECI Prize every three years.
  • 2016: Premio Letterario Merck per la Saggistica, libro “Immunità e vaccini”, Mondadori Ed.
  • 2015: The Milstein Award for Excellence in Interferon and Cytokine Research, International Cytokine & Interferon Society. 
  • 2015: Eur. Soc. Clin. Invest. Albert Struyvenberg Medal
  • 2009: William Harvey Award, Oustanding Scientist 2009, London, UK
  • 2000: Marie T. Bonazinga Award, Boston, USA

 

 

 

Contribution to Public Awareness  of Science

Alberto Mantovani has been actively involved in the fostering of science and scientific policy in Italy at various levels, with a focus on Immunology, Vaccines, Oncology and Public Health, taking public stands on several issues  including quackery whenever appropriate. He regularly contributes to the most authoritative Italian daily newspapers (eg Corriere della Sera; La Repubblica; La Stampa; Il Sole 24 Ore) and magazines (Espresso and Panorama). He wrote three books on Immunology and Science targeted to the lay public (I Guardiani della Vita, Baldini e Castoldi, 2011; Immunità e Vaccini, Mondadori, 2016;  Non avere Paura di Sognare, La Nave di Teseo, 2016). He contributed to scientific (eg SuperQuark; TGR Leonardo; Radiotre Scienza) and general radio (e.g. Radio Tre Scienza) and television (eg Geo; Che Tempo che Fa) programs. To promote science awareness and policy he cofounded the association “ Gruppo2003” of Italian highly cited scientists (gruppo2003.it) and together with astrophysicist Tommaso Maccacaro founded the website scienzainrete.it.

 

Impact

For several years now, bibliometric analyses have indicated that he is the most quoted italian scientist (topitalianscientists.org/Top_italian_scientists_VIA-Academy.aspx;).  The broad impact of the contribution of Alberto Mantovani is testified by citations. As of February 2017 he has over 91,800 (Scopus), 66,700 (Web of Science) or 160,000 (Google Scholar) citations and an H-index of 147 (Scopus), 120 (Web of Science) or 191 (Google Scholar).  A bibliometric analysis indicates that he is one of the most quoted immunologists (tisreports.com/products/19- Top_scientists_in_the_world___the_Via_academy_compilation.aspx).

Why
Humanitas
University?
An Established Institution

An Established Institution
Humanitas is a renowned healthcare institution that has offered Medical Degrees for well over a decade as a partner of the University of Milan.

An International Career

An International Career
Join our international medical community where classes are taught in English by experienced professors and medical doctors from around the world. Your degree will allow you to work as a MD in the EU and abroad.

Clinical Experience

Clinical Experience
Direct clinical experience is supported by a solid tutoring system and starts in your third year, which gives you considerable practical experience.

Innovative and Active Teaching

Innovative and Active Teaching
Humanitas curriculum is enhanced by a wide variety of active learning methods based on a student-centred approach (Problem-Based Learning, Case method, Concept maps, Simulated patients).

Milano and Italy

Milano and Italy
Enjoy the style, culture, gastronomy and entertainment of one of Europe's most exciting cities. Venture further to experience the delights of Italy or use the opportunity to learn Italian.

Advanced Research and Technology

Advanced Research and Technology
Humanitas can count on state-of-the-art technologies and research experience. A new simulation centre of 1000 sm, designed according to the highest technological standards, will be ready for autumn 2017.

Contact Us

Contact
Humanitas University
Via A. Manzoni 113,
Rozzano 20089 Milan, Italy

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