Elio Riboli

Full Professor
Hygiene and Public Health 

Professor of Public Health, Humanitas University, Italy
Professor in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, UK
Coordinator of the Advanced Training Course in Clinical Epidemiology at Humanitas University

Email elio.riboli@hunimed.eu

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Education and Academic Background

Professor Elio Riboli’s career started at the Department of Epidemiology of the National Institute of Cancer, Milan (1978-1983). In 1983 he was appointed Medical Officer in Epidemiology at the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organisation-United Nations (IARC-WHO) based in Lyon, France.  While at IARC in the mid 1980’s, he engaged a novel area of research focusing on the role of diet, nutrition and endogenous hormones in cancer aetiology. In 1988 this materialised into the initiation of the pilot phase of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), and its subsequent funding by the “Europe Against Cancer” programme of the European Commission, from 1992 onward. Professor Riboli has since been the European Coordinator and Principal Investigator of EPIC.

In 2006 Professor Riboli moved from IARC to Imperial College where he was initially appointed Professor and Chair in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention and one year later Head of the Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care (DEPHPC). In 2009, he was appointed Director of the newly established Imperial School of Public Health, which ranked among the two top UK academic institutions in Epidemiology, Public Health and Health Services in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Scientific and Research Interests

Professor Riboli has developed an international research career in the fields of cancer and non-communicable disease epidemiology, translational public health and health promotion. His research activities have led him in the past to identify the need of establishing very large population-based longitudinal cohorts, supported by biobanks, designed to better investigate and understand the role of behavioural, metabolic and genetic factors in the aetiology of cancer and other common chronic diseases.

EPIC   is  a  prospective  cohort  study established in 1992  that  includes  521,000  participating  volunteers  in  24 collaborating centres in 10 European Countries. In EPIC, detailed questionnaire data on diet, lifestyle, personal history and health, standardised anthropometric measurements and 28 aliquotes of blood components (serum, plasma, DNA and erythrocytes) were collected at baseline and stored in liquid nitrogen for future studies. The EPIC biorepository was the first biobank of this size (about 9 million samples) connected with a prospective cohort study ever established in the world.

The research led within EPIC has contributed over the years to the discovery of the role in cancer causation of metabolic factors such as obesity, insulin resistance and other components of the “metabolic syndrome”. Some of these factors were thought to be specific of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. The discovery that these conditions are common risk factors to diverse chronic diseases has provided additional scientific bases for prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Professor Riboli has co-authored over 900 publications and has an h-index of 107 in Scopus.

 

Selected publications

  1. Aune D, Keum N, Giovannucci E…. Riboli E, Norat T (2016). – Whole grain consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause and cause specific mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2016 Jun 14;353:i2716
  2. Muller DC, Murphy N, Johansson M… Riboli E, Brennan P (2016). – Modifiable causes of premature death in middle-age in Western Europe: results from the EPIC cohort study. BMC Med. 2016 Jun 14;14:87
  3. Ezzati M, Riboli E. (2013). – Behavioral and dietary risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. N Engl J Med 369(10):954-64.
  4. Ezzati M, Riboli E (2012). – Can noncommunicable diseases be prevented? Lessons from studies of populations and individuals. Science 337:1482-1487
  5. Pischon T, Boeing H, Hoffmann K, … Riboli E (2008). – General and abdominal adiposity and risk of death in Europe. N Engl J Med 359:2105-2120

 

Academic honors, awards and prizes

  • Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, UK
  • Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians, UK
  • Visiting Professor at New York University, US
  • Visiting Professor at the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore
  • Marsilius Lecture in Medicine and Public Health, Heidelberg University, June 2015
  • French National Prize for Research Nutrition, National Institute of Nutrition, Paris, December 2003
Why
Humanitas
University?
An Established Institution

An Established Institution
Humanitas is a renowned healthcare institution that has offered Medical Degrees for well over a decade as a partner of the University of Milan.

An International Career

An International Career
Join our international medical community where classes are taught in English by experienced professors and medical doctors from around the world. Your degree will allow you to work as a MD in the EU and abroad.

Clinical Experience

Clinical Experience
Direct clinical experience is supported by a solid tutoring system and starts in your third year, which gives you considerable practical experience.

Innovative and Active Teaching

Innovative and Active Teaching
Humanitas curriculum is enhanced by a wide variety of active learning methods based on a student-centred approach (Problem-Based Learning, Case method, Concept maps, Simulated patients).

Milano and Italy

Milano and Italy
Enjoy the style, culture, gastronomy and entertainment of one of Europe's most exciting cities. Venture further to experience the delights of Italy or use the opportunity to learn Italian.

Advanced Research and Technology

Advanced Research and Technology
Humanitas can count on state-of-the-art technologies and research experience. A new simulation centre of 1000 sm, designed according to the highest technological standards, will be ready for autumn 2017.

Contact Us

Contact
Humanitas University
Via Rita Levi Montalcini 4,
Pieve Emanuele 20090 Milan, Italy

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